Throw Escapes

Jan 18, 2013
Throw Escapes
  • Even though Attacks beat Throws, they aren't the best nor safest way to deal with an opponent attempting to throw you. Firstly, you'll usually be attacking from disadvantage and this makes you highly vulnerable to being Counter Hit, and potentially losing a lot of health from the ensuing combo. Secondly, there are times when the opponent's throw is guaranteed to connect, so you don't even have the option to attack.

    To avoid being thrown, you can input a Throw Escape.

    If your Throw Escape is successful, you'll prevent the throw from occurring, and after the unique throw escape animation completes, you may find yourself in a favourable position (e.g. facing your opponent's side or back).


    Basic Rules(top)


    Throw Escape inputs are valid from the moment a throw starts to execute, up to 10 frames after the throw's active frame. Given that throws take 10 frames to execute, this represents a window of 20 frames in which you can successfully escape.
    The basic rules that apply to all Throw Escapes are:
    • Throws executed from the front, or side, while in the standing or crouching state, can be escaped.
    • Only one Throw Escape input is allowed. Unlike previous versions of VF, Multiple Throw Escapes (MTE) are no longer possible.
    • Back Throws cannot be escaped.
    • Catch throws cannot be escaped, although their follow-ups can.
    The specifics regarding High, Low and Side Throw Escapes are discussed in the following sections.

    High Throw Escapes(top)


    With the simplified throwing system introduced in Final Showdown, the Throw Escape rules have also been simplified, however, the principle remains unchanged:

    To escape a High Throw, enter [4], [5] or [6][P][+][G] where the direction corresponds to the last direction of the opponent's throw.


    In the figure below, Player 1 successfully escapes Player 2 throw with the [6][P][+][G] throw escape input.

    high-throw-escape.jpg

    For throws with multiple directional inputs, such as Wolf's Giant Swing [4][1][2][3][6][P][+][G], you simply just input the last direction [6][P][+][G] at the time the throw would connect. Similarly, neutral throws are simply escaped the same way, using [P][+][G] with no directional input.

    Low Throw Escapes(top)


    Escaping Low Throws (i.e. throws against a crouching player) follow the same rules as those for standing throws.

    To escape a Low Throw, enter [1], [2] or [3][P][+][G] where the direction corresponds to the last direction of the opponent's throw.


    For example, to escape Jeffry's Powerbomb [3][P][+][G], you must input [3][P][+][G] at the time the throw would connect.

    As with high throws, you are only allowed to enter one valid Low Throw Escape input.

    Side Throw Escapes(top)


    Side Throws Escapes have their own specific rule, and do not follow regular throw escape convention. Instead of entering the corresponding direction of the opponent's throw, Side Throw Escape inputs solely depend on which side of your player's body, left or right, the opponent is grabbing you from.

    To escape a Side Throw, enter LEFT [P][+][G] or RIGHT [P][+][G], where the direction corresponds to the side the opponent grabs you from.


    In the figure below, Player 2 attacks Player 2 with a Side Turning move. As a result, Player 1's right side is exposed, therefore, in order to escape the side throw, Player 1 enters "right" [P][+][G], which equates to [6][P][+][G].

    side-throw-escape.jpg

    It's important to note here that the terms LEFT or RIGHT are deliberately used to denote the physical direction you must enter on the Joystick. Therefore, Player 1's LEFT direction equates to "back", whereas Player 2's LEFT direction equates to "forward". This is why Side Throw Escape directions need to be qualified, because simply listing the input as [4] would always mean "back" for both Player 1 or Player 2. The figure below helps to illustrate this point.

    side-throw-escape-diagram.jpg

    Similarly, escaping Low Side Throws follows the same rule except that you need to include a downward direction along with the left or right input.

    To escape a Low Side Throw, enter DOWN-LEFT [P][+][G] or DOWN-RIGHT [P][+][G], where the direction corresponds to the side the opponent grabs you from.


    Down Throw Escapes(top)


    Down Throws are only possible during a knock down situation for characters that have them. There are situations where Down Throws are guaranteed to connect as well, so be on the look-out for them.

    To escape Down Throws, enter [2][P][+][G] or [3][P][+][G] when being thrown.


    ground-throw-escape.jpg

    As a means of preventing any confusion caused by the camera, the system will treat a [1][P][+][G] input the same as [3][P][+][G]. The guessing game remains the same, however, you must choose between down or a downward-diagonal direction.

    Special Throw Escapes(top)


    Some characters in the game have special holding or mounting throws that allow for certain follow-ups. Examples of these special holds includes Brad's Neck Clinch, Wolf's Catch and Vanessa's Mount. The rules to escape the follow-ups are identical to the High Throw Escape rule:

    To escape a Special Throw follow-up, enter [4], [5] or [6][P][+][G] where the direction corresponds to the opponent's follow-up input.


    The are, however, two exceptions to this rule.

    Exception 1: Goh's Tsukami(top)


    Goh's Tsukami is a standing hold which allows Goh to optionally drag you around the ring for a fixed distance. The Tsukami has 5 possible follow-ups (back, forward, up, down and neutral) where each requires a specific escape input. To escape neutral, you input [G] but to escape any of the directions you need to input such that your character opposes the direction:

    Goh drags you up, you need to input down.
    Goh drags you down, you need to input up.
    Goh drags you back, you need to input back.
    Goh drags you forward, you need to input forward.


    So the best way to deal with Goh's Tsukami is to hold [G] which will always escape the neutral follow-up, and then enter either [4], [6], [2] or [8] such as to oppose the direction you think Goh will drag you. By combining the neutral + direction escape inputs, you have a 1 in 4 chance of success.

    In the figure below, Player 1 is caught in Player 2's Tsukami. Player 1 holds [G] and then down ([2]) on the joystick, successfully escaping Player 2's attempt to drag them up ([8]).

    goh-tsukami-escape.jpg

    Exception 2: Aoi's Throw Combo(top)


    Aoi's throw combos, the Chougarami ([6][3][2][1][4][P][+][G]) and Wakigarami ([4][1][2][3][6][P][+][G]), are regular High Throws that can be escaped as per the normal rules. However, if you fail to escape, Aoi has two additional follow-ups that will deal more damage. These follow-ups can be escaped, and even if you fail to escape the second part, you still have a chance to escape the third. Both the second and third throw follow-ups end in either a [2] or [8] directional input. While it's a 50/50 guess, the [2] direction is the more damaging option if the throw combo is fully executed. Consult the VFDC Command Lists for Aoi for the throw damage values.

    To escape Aoi's Multi-Part throw follow-ups, enter [2] or [8][P][+][G] where the direction corresponds to the last direction of Aoi's follow-up.


    In the figure below, Player 1 is caught by Player 2's Throw Combo. Player 1 holds [2][P][+][G] and successfully escapes the second part of the throw combo.

    aoi-throw-combo-escape.jpg

    Throw Escape Techniques(top)


    Once you understand the simple rules for how Throw Escapes work, the next step is to learn how to apply them effectively during battle. The one throw escape technique you absolutely should learn how to perform reliably is the Guarding Throw Escape. This, and other techniques for entering Throw Escapes are discussed below.

    Guarding Throw Escape(top)


    Guarding Throw Escape (GTE) is a technique newly introduced to VF5 Final Showdown, and it allows you to both Guard against an attack while also holding a Throw Escape ready.

    GTE is performed by first holding [G], which puts you into Guard, then hold [P] with an optional direction [4], [5] or [6]


    For example, if you hold [G], then enter and hold [6_][P] such that you're now holding [6_][P][+][G], you'll successfully guard all high and mid attacks, as well as successfully escape any throw attempt that ends in the [6] direction.

    To demonstrate, in the figure below Player 1 has their attack guarded, and during recovery presses and holds [G], followed by [6_][P]. In this scenario, Player 2 counter attacks with [6][P] which is successfully guarded by Player 1.

    guard-throw-escape-1.jpg

    Following the same setup, Player 2 now chooses to counter attack with a [6][P][+][G] throw instead, but that's successfully escaped by Player 1 using the same input.

    guard-throw-escape-2.jpg

    It's very important that you enter the input in the correct sequence ([G] before [P]). If you enter [P] and [G] together, you'll get a throw attempt instead and will be subject to Counter Hit, as shown below:

    guard-throw-escape-3.jpg

    The GTE technique also works with guarding low attacks and escaping low throws.

    Low GTE is performed by first holding [2][G], which puts you into Low Guard, then hold [P] with an optional direction [1], [2] or [3]


    Evading Throw Escape(top)


    The ability to buffer a Throw Escape makes it possible to build in some protection against throws where you would otherwise be vulnerable to them. An example of this is during an Evade.

    Ordinarily you would Evade when disadvantaged in anticipation of an attack, but the opponent may instead attempt a throw. In this situation, immediately after inputting the Evade, you can buffer a Throw escape input as well. This is the Evading Throw Escape (ETE) technique.

    Furthermore, you should enter the Throw Escape using the GTE technique described aboe. This will ensure that you'll be Guarding at the end of the Evade, and not vulnerable to attack.

    ETE is performed by evading [8] or [2], immediately followed by holding [G], then hold [P] with an optional direction [4], [5] or [6]


    To demonstrate, in the figure below Player 1 has entered an evade input [8] during the recovery of their guarded attack. During the evade, Player 1 proceeds to enter the GTE input: press-and-hold [G], then (in this example) [6_][P]. As you can see, Player 1 completes the evade in a standing Guard, and with a throw escape primed just in case.

    evade-throw-escape-1.jpg

    Following the same setup, Player 2 now chooses to counter attack with a [6][P][+][G] throw instead, but that's successfully escaped by Player 1 using the same input.

    evade-throw-escape-2.jpg

    It's very important that you enter the input in the correct button sequence ([G] before [P]). If you enter [P] and [G] together, when the evade completes you won't be holding guard. As you can see below, with the [6_] direction held, Player 1 is walking toward Player 2 when the evade completes, and this is not ideal!

    evade-throw-escape-3.jpg

    Reversal Throw Escape(top)


    Similar in concept to the ETE, when you attempt a Reversal, or any non-attacking parrying manoeuvre, you can also buffer in a Throw Escape using the GTE technique. This is the Reversal Throw Escape (RTE) technique.

    RTE is performed by entering a Reversal ([4], [1] or [2][P][+][K]), immediately followed by holding [G] with an optional direction [4], [5] or [6]


    To demonstrate, in the figure below Player 1 has their attack guarded, and during recovery enters a reversal command ([1][P][+][K]), quickly followed by a throw escape ([6][P][+][G]). In this scenario, Player 2 counter attacks with mid attack which is successfully reversed by Player 1.

    reversal-throw-escape-1.jpg

    Following the same setup, Player 2 now chooses to counter attack with a [6][P][+][G] throw instead, but that's successfully escaped by Player 1 using the same input.

    reversal-throw-escape-2.jpg

    You may find other opportunities during special actions to quickly buffer in a Throw Escape input for added protection when you're vulnerable against throws.
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PReP, BlueLink, aoi ameindei and 6 others like this.